• How have we arrived at our current educational system in the United States, which is complex, flawed, but still admired around the world in some ways? What problems and solutions feel new but in fact have surfaced before? This series is a short history of education in America that covers key problems, solutions, movements, people and events since the founding of the U.S.

  • There is a huge amount to cover in the history of education in the United States, so where should we start? This module covers some basic stepping stones to get you started on topics like the rationales behind public school systems, the struggles of teachers, how America has struggled to increase quality and opportunity in schools, how our advancements in science have changed how we educate our children, and why North Carolina is a good microcosm of national trends in education.

  • It's easy for us to assume that High School is a natural part of our education system, but that was not true 100 years ago. So how did we end up with the secondary "High" school that we have today, and what purposes has it served to society over time? This module covers the key moments in the history of high school: the people, the public policy arguments, and the events that helped to create the system we have today.

  • Kindergarten was a revolutionary new set of educational ideas that shook up the established institutions. Instead of reading, there was gardening. Instead of lecture and repetition, there was personal discovery. And yet it took a very long time to become universal. This module covers the key elements, people, and events behind the spread of Kindergarten.

  • What can a school program from 150 years ago teach us today? Not only did it change our minds about what education’s role was in a modern society, but it also tried to solve policy issues that are still being debated today.

  • The United States has simultaneously struggled to provide truly equal opportunity in education and to also improve the quality of that education. Because of the limitations to funding and trends in society, politics, and economics, we continue to feel tension between these two goals at different points even today. This module discusses some of the major reasons behind this struggle and uses examples from multiple levels of education throughout American history.